Episode 180, Stuart Bogie

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Stuart Bogie is a hell of a guy and a damn fine saxophonist. Incredibly active in the Brooklyn scene, he has been a member of Antibalas since 2001 and was the featured soloist in the Bill T. Jones Broadway production of Fela!. He’s recorded extensively with bands the Arcade Fire, Iron & Wine, TV on the Radio and many many more. He leads the band Superhuman Happiness, who release their new album “Beacon” this Friday, 10/19, on Yeggs Records. This is a great talk with a great dude.

STUART BOGIE

Episode 179, Matthew Shipp Part II

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Back in 2013, shortly after the podcast began, Matthew Shipp came by for what became the most talked about episode in the whole series, and now he’s back. Having gotten the biographical information covered in our first talk, today’s episode is me and Matt chewing the fat. One of the most prolific and engaging personalities in contemporary jazz, Matt brought along some great stories for our second sit down.

MATTHEW SHIPP

Episode 178, Leila Bordreuil

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Born in Brooklyn, raised in the south of France, Leila Bordreuil is a classically trained cellist whose work sits at the intersection of improvisation, noise and sound art. Based ion Brooklyn since 2012, she has worked closely with Michael Foster, Zach Rowden, Lea Bertucci and Weasel Walter. This conversation was just recorded last week as Leila gets ready to premiere a new piece at Issue Project Room this Wednesday!

LEILA BORDREUIL

Episode 177, David Krakauer

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No one does it like Krakauer! An absolute virtuoso on the clarinet, David Krakauer is a scholar, traveler, story teller and much more. Born and raised in New York City, he studied closely with Leon Russianoff. He was a founding member of the Klezmatics and released the very first record in the Tzadik Radical Jewish series. Today is a good one that covers a lot of ground and history with the undisputed maestro of the klezmer clarinet. You’re gonna dig this.

DAVID KRAKAUER

Episode 176, Brandon Seabrook

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Today is a good one. Originally from Massachusetts, trained at the New England Conservatory and based in Brooklyn for the last fifteen years, Brandon Seabrook is a true original. Equally adept at the electric guitar as he is at the banjo, his playing is intense, complex, intricate and completely over the top. He's worked closely with artists such as Peter Evans, Jessica Pavone, Anthony Braxton, Nels Cline Cooper-Moore and Mary Halvorson. He leads his own bands, Die Trommel Fatale, Seabrook Power Plant, Needle Driver and most recently, the Brandon Seabrook Trio featuring Daniel Levin on cello, and Henry Fraser on bass. Brandon is deeply funny and original cat. We need more Brandon Seabrooks.

BRANDON SEABROOK

Episode 175, Josh Sinton, Part II

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After an intense period of emotional upheaval, saxophonist Josh Sinton decided to take a break from music this past January. He cancelled all shows, departed social media and has been laying low. He stopped by 5049 chihuahua compound last month to talk about what he's been up to and what led to the break. I love this dude.

JOSH SINTON

Episode 173, Sandy Ewen

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Brooklyn based and Houston raised, Sandy Ewen has been incredibly active for the past several years as an improviser with an idiosyncratic approach to the guitar that is all her own. She's worked closely with Maria Chavez, Weasel Walter, Damon Smith and Tom Carter.  Her language for guitar is incredibly evocative and tactile. She is a wonderful addition to the New York scene as well as a delightful person to spend an afternoon with, talking about a broad range of topics.

SANDY EWEN

Episode 171, James Fei

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Composer/saxophonist/educator/electronic musician stays busy, very busy. He's a scholar and a gentleman. Raised in Taipei, he originally moved to the United States to study electrical engineering at Princeton, before getting bitten by the experimental/contemporary music bug. He's studied with Anthony Braxton, Alvin Lucier and Milton Babbitt and has performed his own work all over the world at the Kitchen, SF MOMA, STEIM and many more. He's a solid and thoughtful music maker and his wide interests seem to only broaden with time and experience.

JAMES FEI

Episode 170, Ben Hall

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At age 41, Detroit native Ben Hall has already done more than most people do in a lifetime. He's a talented drummer and has worked closely with many of today's greatest improvisers such as Joe Morris, Bill Dixon, Nate Wooley and Don Dietrich. He holds an MFA from Columbia in sculpture and has shown his work all over the world. He curates and maintains the Bap-Tizum website,the world’s largest online Black American spiritual collection and is the owner/operator of Broken Research Records. If that wasn't enough, he is also a talented chef/restaurant owner who's progressive business practices offer a shining light to an industry not commonly associated with strong personal ethics. Ben is quite simply one of the most extraordinary people around and I wish this conversation could have gone on for days.

BEN HALL

BROKEN RESEARCH

BAP-TIZUM

RUSSELL STREET DELI

 

Episode 169, Brian Chase Part II

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For episode 169 my dear friend and long-time collaborator Brian Chase returns to the podcast to talk about his newest venture, Chaikin Records. Recorded in the work-in-progress recording studio in his Brooklyn basement, Brian talks me through the idea to start his own label, his grandfather for the he named the label, his long-running project Drums & Drones and much more. As a special treat, Brian demonstrates a piece for Drums & Drones. There's no one better than Brian.

BRIAN CHASE

CHAIKIN RECORDS

Episode 168, Samara Lubelski

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Samara Lubelski is a prolific singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who was born and raised in Lower Manhattan. Trained as a violinist, she has been active since the early 90s in an incredibly broad range of music. Under her own name she has released several recordings of incredibly detailed and intimate pop songs on labels like Social Registry and Ecstatic Peace. She has contributed to the recordings of Fiery Furnaces, Nate Wooley, MV & EE, Thurston Moore and many many more. As it turns out, Samara and I are also neighbors.Today's talk covers a lot of ground, a lot of which centers around the peculiarities of New York City. It's a good one and I'm happy to share it with you.

SAMARA LUBELSKI

Episode 166, Dave Harrington

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Guitarist and multi-instrumentalist Dave Harrington is one hell of a nice guy and a monster on his instrument. A lifelong New Yorker, he spent his teenage years sneaking into shows at Tonic and the Knitting Factory, absorbing the music of Sex Mob, Bill Frisell and Marc Ribot, while studying bass with Brad Jones. For many years he was one half of the duo Darkside and more recently leads his own groups the Dave Harrington Group and the Merry Pranksters. He can frequently be founded performing in a variety of settings at Nublu in NYC as well as DJing parties around the world. He's a solid cat.
 

DAVE HARRINGTON

Episode 165, Patrick Holmes

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Patrick Holmes. There are few people in the world of New York music and night life whom I adore as much as Patrick Holmes. Originally from Austin, TX he (like me) started on electric bass as a teenager, switching over to the clarinet at age 24. He's been in New York for the past twenty years, working diligently to refine a voice and approach to the clarinet that is uniquely his own. He has studied with Connie Crothers and Sabir Mateen and he has performed with Ryan Sawyer, Daniel Carter, Masami Tomihisa, Axel Dörner and many many more. Whether it's about clarinets, jazz, booze, food, metal or just plain shit, Patrick is one of my favorite people to talk to and I'm really happy that this conversation finally happened for the podcast.

Episode 164, 5049 Live #1: Toby Driver

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For our first foray into the live podcast medium, we are joined by our old friend and collaborator, Toby Driver. He was the very first guest on the podcast back in 2013, and when we pulled the plug back in 2015, he was the last. For this episode, Toby is accompanied by String Noise (Conrad Harris & Pauline Kim Harris) to present some of his recent ballads. Moody, gothic songs, reminiscent of Current 93, Nick Cave and of course, Kayo Dot. Toby!

KAYO DOT

Episode 163, MC Paul Barman

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Originally from New Jersey, MC Paul Barman is an undisputed master of wordplay and a singular voice in the world of hip-hop. We've been friends since 2002 and he was the one of the first people that I wanted to get on the podcast. Five years later, it's finally happened and it's a really, really good one. His new album (((Echo Chamber))) is out now and is essential listening. Do it!

MC PAUL BARMAN

Episode 162, Robbie Lee

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Robbie Lee is a multi-instrumentalist who plays an array of instruments, all inter-connected for him, but sometimes far apart in sound and genre. He grew up in Massachusetts but has lived in Brooklyn for the past several years where he has founded two record labels, I and Ear, and more recently Telegraph Harp. Frequently he appears behind the scenes, performing as a sideman, producer and engineer. He recently stopped by to discuss two upcoming records of his own, both of which represent a major step forward as an artist: a trio with Norbert Rodenkirchen and James Ilgenfritz called Opalescence, coming out on Telegraph Harp June 22, as well as a duo with the great Mary Halvorson, Seed Triangular, coming out on New Amsterdam this fall.

ROBBIE LEE

TELEGRAPH HARP

Episode 161, Dave Burrell

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Dave Burrell is an absolute legend of free music. Raised in Hawaii, he moved to the Lower East Side after doing his time at Berklee, where he began playing with Marion Brown and Pharoah Sanders. He was there for Slugs' Saloon and loft jazz. He's led a most colorful path as a composer/performer, writing operas, traveling the world and refining an instrumental language that is completely top shelf. Currently his life's work is being celebrated at the 23rd annual Vision Festival in New York City and I couldn't be happier that it brought him by the Chihuahua Compound for a chant and chew. Dave is an artist both generous of music and spirit and an absolute joy to speak with.  Get ready for a good one.

DAVE BURRELL